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Nuvotech Releases Script Studio® Creative Writing Software For Mac & PC

Filed under: Press Releases by admin @ 11:35 am on August 28, 2017

August 28, 2017 (London, UK) – UK technology company Nuvotech today announced the release of Script Studio® creative writing software – an innovative Mac & Windows desktop application for screenwriters, playwrights and novelists.

Script Studio - Creative Writing Software
 

Nuvotech has given its popular script and story development app Movie Outline a complete facelift, recoded the application from the ground up and rebranded it as Script Studio. This latest incarnation, which is now a serious contender for industry leader Final Draft, has a fresh, modern user-interface that is identical on Mac and Windows operating systems and supports the latest technologies such as Retina / HiDPI and Windows Touch Screen gestures.

“This is our biggest upgrade ever and we’ve really gone to town”, said Dan Bronzite, CEO, produced screenwriter and head developer. “Our primary objective is to streamline the writing process, giving writers both the space to create and the tools they need to effectively plan, structure, format and develop their screenplay.”

Some of the most notable additions to Script Studio are a dedicated novel mode, night mode, WYSIWYG Dual Dialogue that you can edit in situ, a global Scratch Pad, a bespoke Courier Nuvo font designed for writing screenplays, and improved import and export functionality that handles Final Draft 10 and Fountain files.”

Support For International Users

Perhaps the most crucial advancement is Script Studio’s newly implemented support for Unicode and diacritics, something which competitors Final Draft and Movie Magic have not provided to date. Script Studio also boasts the addition of over 100 international dictionaries and thesauri and the ability to write your script in right-to-left languages such as Hebrew, Arabic, Persian scripts and Urdu.

“Supporting the international writer was one of our key goals” remarks Nuvotech’s Product Manager Evelyne Kennedy. “While we understand that North America and Hollywood in particular is a key hotspot for screenwriting, there are many scriptwriting communities and production hubs all over the world, Bollywood being a prime example, and we wanted to ensure that Script Studio was accessible to those regions and users.”

Product Roadmap

When discussing the future of Script Studio, Evelyne Kennedy kept her cards close to her chest but hinted on an exciting few years ahead for users of their screenwriting software. She also noted the emerging importance of mobile screenwriting and cloud connectivity and confirmed that the iOS version is in active development.

Key Features

  • Professional Industry Standard Screenplay Formatting & Pagination
  • Sequence Outlining & Story Organization
  • Character Development Tools
  • Dedicated Novel Mode & Chapter Headings
  • Audience Engagement & Analysis Charting
  • Visual Drag ‘n’ Drop Index Cards
  • Color-Coded Structuring & Customizable Templates
  • Character Dialogue Focus
  • Global Scratch Pad
  • Story Tasks “To Do” List
  • Screenwriting Glossary
  • Dictation Assistant
  • Table Read “Text-To-Speech”
  • Powerful Print, Import & Export Options
  • 12 Scene by Scene Hollywood Movie Breakdowns & Analyses
  • 100% Cross-Platform File Exchange & Matching Modern UI

New In Script Studio

The latest release also includes full screen mode for distraction free writing, first-line indent and document leading options, customizable television, stageplay and musical layout templates, a character name wizard and gallery of headshot images, global search, Fountain markup and Final Draft 10 import/export and the ability to import and merge data from a third-party document format or another project file into an existing project.

Download a Free Trial or Buy Now from the Script Studio Store.

Educational Solutions

Script Studio is ideal for students learning screenwriting because of its intuitive and structured approach to story development which allows you to build your script or novel step by step and chapter by chapter and can easily be tailored into modules for teaching. The software is already adopted by schools and universities across North America and Europe and Nuvotech strongly supports this through affordable academic pricing for individual licenses and multiple seats for screenwriting labs.

Pricing and Availability

Script Studio is available as a download from the Script Studio website for Mac 10.7 and Windows 7 or higher operating systems. The suggested retail price is $199.95 but competitive upgrades and academic pricing is available if you contact Nuvotech directly.

About Nuvotech

Nuvotech is a software and web services company based in London, England founded in 1999 by produced screenwriter Dan Bronzite to offer innovative software and services for the creative writing industry. Its most recognized brands are Script Studio, a cross-platform creative writing application, and Hollywood Script Express a script copying and delivery service in Los Angeles.

Creating Effective Scene Transitions

Filed under: Dan Bronzite's Script Tips by Dan @ 2:48 pm on January 5, 2012

Sometimes as writers we get so caught up with developing the crucial elements of a screenplay such as character arcs, plot logic, theme, structure and snappy dialogue that we forget how important it is to write effective scene to scene transitions.  Of course, you don’t want this kind of thing to hinder your creative flow but at some point, perhaps the day after writing a scene, or during the first rewrite, I encourage you to pay attention to this stylistic aspect of your screenplay.

You have probably read books or articles in which many screenwriting professionals recommend that you do not include camera directions and musical choices in your script, and for the most part this is true, they should be left for the director, but I do think that sometimes it is acceptable to include these stylistic elements in your script because they help to set the scene, evoke an emotion and reveal your screenwriter’s voice.

Writing an effective scene to scene transition can help crank up the pace or even provide a subtle subtext through sound and visuals that enhance a piece of dramatic script writing.

An example would be these two scenarios:

a)    A husband and wife argue at home late at night.  The wife ends the row by slamming the bathroom door shut.  We then cut to the next day and a wide shot of a car factory, within which is the husband, hard at work on the production line.

This example tells the story but how about this alternative:

b)    Cut from the door slam to a close-up of a hammer hitting a piece of metal.  We then reveal the husband working in a car factory pounding a car door.

The second scenario tells the same story but adds impact through the use of transition and carries the undertone of frustration from the end of one scene through to the beginning of another, suggesting that the argument, while over, is not forgotten and is still playing on the husband’s mind.  Visually it is also more powerful.

Be innovative with your scene transitions. Dissolve from a ticking clock in one location to a broken clock in another.  Cut from a burglar getting away to a barking dog chasing a ball.  But remember, don’t get carried away and overuse these stylistic choices because if you try to be too clever with every transition they will start to stick out like a sore thumb and cumulatively have a negative affect on your screenplay. In short, pay attention to detail. This may just be the icing on the cake but is important none the less.

What is the Time Frame of Your Screenplay?

Filed under: Dan Bronzite's Script Tips by Dan @ 2:45 pm on December 26, 2011

When you first get the idea for a story it will probably focus around an interesting character, event, act three plot twist, high concept or thrilling action sequence, but one thing we do not normally consider at the start of the creative writing process is the time frame of the piece. Is your story set in a single day?  During the course of a week?  A month? Or even over several years?  The time frame you choose will have a significant impact on how you tell your story and the pacing of the narrative.

Clarifying the timeline of your story right from the start will save you a great deal of time and effort in rewrites further down the road when you ultimately discover that you have either tried to squeeze too much information into your script or conversely need more scenes to pad it out.  But even if we put the technicalities of the time frame aside, choosing a time frame to suit the genre or story can actually enhance the drama.

Think of a film like John Badham’s Nick of Time in which Johnny Depp has only ninety minutes to save his six-year-old daughter.  And then there’s the excellent TV series 24 which not only uses the time frame of a single day to heighten the tension and suspense but also as a stylistic device by presenting multiple events that are happening in various locations simultaneously through split-screen.

When you plan your script, consider what will be the best time frame for your story.  There’s nothing wrong with having a drama take place over many years.  This will of course slow the overall pacing of the piece but that may be appropriate to your story choice and help an audience identify with your characters as they develop.  However, would the same time frame work for an action movie?  It may, so long as you have given it some thought at the start, understand the possible obstacles your chosen time frame may introduce and create some innovative solutions to these hurdles.

Remember, there are no hard and fast rules and every story is different, principally because every screenwriter has their own voice.  This is what makes screenwriting so interesting.  Just be aware of how important time frame is to storytelling and how the wrong choice at the start could create a mountain of problems either for you as a writer or for an audience trying to engage with your tale.

The Selfless Hero

Filed under: Dan Bronzite's Script Tips by Dan @ 2:04 pm on October 27, 2011

When we think of a hero in a movie we immediately assume we are talking about the central character otherwise known as the Protagonist, but many stories conceal a multitude of heroes, often unsung, in secondary, supporting roles that are just as important to the narrative and Protagonist’s psychological development and physical journey.

Think of Obi-Wan Kenobi in the original “Star Wars”. He is a hero in his own right because he allows himself to be slain by Darth Vader in order to push Luke Skywalker toward the next stage in his journey. Without this sacrifice Luke would depend on his mentor to see him through the final conflict instead of believing in his own inner strength.  And that is the key to a good hero.  Someone who sacrifices their own needs – or indeed life – for the sake of the greater good.

When constructing a story, writers typically focus on the central plot and central character, and this normally results in villains and secondary characters entering the stage simply to support what has already been established.  This can inevitably lead to two-dimensional characters that become sounding boards or vessels for exposition, and a central storyline that makes sense but is unfulfilling to an audience.

Instead, try introducing well-defined, three-dimensional characters with their own lives and stories outside of the main plot and then weave these secondary stories around the central storyline, and design some of the Protagonist’s story choices around the secondary characters.  This may not always work and you should obviously never lose focus of the principle story and character but the process will open your mind to new avenues and hopefully create a more rounded and engaging narrative.

Treat every character as a hero, even the villains.  That’s right, villains are heroes of their own stories.  When we think of Alan Rickman’s enigmatic villain Hans Gruber in “Die Hard” we see a guy who wants to steal money and kill whoever gets in his way.  But perhaps there is more to his story than we know?  Perhaps the screenwriter explored a complex backstory for Gruber that never made it to the big screen – because it was unnecessary for an audience and would more than likely be overly expositional – but knowing about Gruber’s childhood and experiences may have helped shape the part.

I am sure that Alan Rickman didn’t just read the role as a villain and that was that.  Like all good actors, especially those who believe in “the method”, he may have tried to find a spark of humanity in Gruber, something he could use to justify Gruber’s actions.  Maybe Gruber’s father used to work for a big conglomerate like the Nakatomi Corporation and that they fired him and it lead to the break up and suicide of his father.  Gruber would of course never reveal this to his accomplices but for him, the heist meant more than money.  It was revenge and closure.  A salute to his father.

By understanding that EVERYONE in a movie has a story to tell and a life beyond the bounds of the movie screen and pages of a screenplay we can begin to view each role, from hero to grumpy waitress with only three lines, with the respect they deserve.  The truth is, that grumpy waitress is the way she is because her boss is a jerk, she has no love life and is working three jobs so she can afford to look after her sick mother.  She is the epitome of the “selfless hero” – but we’ll never know.

Pacing is Often the Key to a Successful Screenplay

Filed under: Dan Bronzite's Script Tips by Dan @ 1:53 pm on September 17, 2011

To help you understand story pacing and how to write a script that keeps the reader turning the page it may help to think of your screenplay as a piece of music.  The music can be in any genre since most pop and rock songs share the same constant as is apparent in classical pieces – they all have a melodic rhythm with highs and lows. If they didn’t then essentially it would not really be called “music” but “noise”.

Let’s first consider a pop song.  Some start out loud and fast with an intro that reflects the chorus or the actual chorus itself and then dips to begin the first verse which is normally slower.  After this comes the bridge which steps up the pace a little leading us into the chorus.. and then this repeats until the end of the song.  About three-quarters of the way through there is normally the middle-8 section which is different from the verse, bridge and chorus in rhythm and melody and this helps break up the pattern before the last chorus.

All of these different sections of a typical song create pace, fast and slow, slow and fast and this pacing keeps us engaged.  Let’s not forget, a song is more than music, it’s a story in itself, whether it has words or it doesn’t have words.  Even classical music tells a story through the choice of instruments used, the melody and the arrangement.  That’s why it’s so natural to compare musical rhythm and pacing with script writing because they share the same core principles.

Another great analogy is the roller-coaster ride which also applies to movie making and screenplay writing. A roller-coaster also goes up and down.  Trust me, you wouldn’t go back to Six Flags theme park if all of the rides literally went from A to B on the same level at the same speed – would you?  No, they good rides create tension, anticipation and excitement through the design of the twists and turns, where they are positioned, the acceleration and deceleration, and the slow climb followed by the dip.  All of these ingredients combine to create “entertainment” for the participant and as a script reader or audience member you want to experience the same thrills when reading a script or watching a movie.

Remember, it’s your job as a screenwriter to keep the reader turning the page.  You have to build toward those key moments of heightened action or drama in your story and then follow them with a lull that becomes the beginning of the next big crescendo.  By visualizing your narrative in this way you will ensure that your script stands out and provides a roller-coaster read!  And if you want to analyze the pacing of your own creative writing projects, I recommend our screenwriting software Movie Outline 3 which includes a unique and innovative story pacing feature called FeelFactors.

Humor in a Dark Place

Filed under: Dan Bronzite's Script Tips by Dan @ 1:51 pm on September 7, 2011

The world we live in isn’t perfect and to be honest, although every day we all strive for perfection in one way or another, our lives would probably be pretty boring if Utopia did exist for us.  The simple truth is, bad things happen all the time and as human beings we are designed to deal with these events in different ways.  We all process information differently depending on our personality and the experiences that have shaped us and as such, not everybody is going to react to bad news in the same way.  Ultimately we are pretty tough creatures and it is our instinct to survive and we’ll do whatever we need to, with some exceptions, to live another day.

An example would be when a close family member or friend dies.  We cry, often uncontrollably.  We mourn.  We remember the good times. We go through all the stages of grief, but hopefully, at some point in time, we are able to move on.  We finally wake up one day without that horrible experience being the first thing on our mind.  We put one foot in front of the other and get on with our life.

Humor is one of those great wonders we are blessed with that can help.  Even in the darkest of places a witty line can suddenly put things into perspective and help to get us through a tough day.  It doesn’t have to be a joke, maybe just a comical observation or random, surreal thought.  Whatever it is, that moment of comedy works like a band aid and helps lift the tension.  This principle is also true when it comes to screenwriting.

Audiences love to laugh.  Now sometimes it may not be appropriate but that could be the best time to insert a subtle gag or some light-hearted comic relief into your script.  Okay, this may not be the greatest of ideas for certain sensitive subjects and scenes but why not give it a try and lighten the mood with a quip. Sarcasm is human nature and wit might lift an otherwise flat moment in your screenplay. Sometimes people laugh uncontrollably simply out of nervousness and not being able to digest the dark information that has just been fed to them.  And this can also create great comedy, especially if someone laughs at an inappropriate moment because this causes conflict and as we all know, conflict is crucial to creating an engaging story and three-dimensional characters.

Character Arcs are the Foundation of an Engaging Story

Filed under: Dan Bronzite's Script Tips by Dan @ 1:23 pm on July 9, 2011

So what is a character arc, you ask?  Sounds complicated.  Well, it doesn’t have to be, although a complicated character arc may be just what your screenplay needs. A character arc could also be described as a journey that a person goes on during the course of your movie, or the development in their personality they experience or the evolution of an aspect of their persona – such as emotional, physical or psychological.  All of the above are valid character arcs that could help to engage an audience.

Why does a character need an arc?  Well, it may be intentional that your protagonist (hero or heroine) doesn’t, and if so, that’s fine, so long as it is clear that is the case and that the rest of the story and theme support this choice.  But more often than not a film will lose an audience if the lead character does not go on some kind of transformational journey.

Think of Luke Skywalker in the first Star Wars movie and also in the complete franchise.  He starts off as a naive farm boy with foolish hopes of exploring the solar system. He struggles with authority and even the notion of responsibility and “The Force”. But as the story progresses, obstacles are thrown in his way which he must summon up an inner strength he did not know he had in order to overcome, and by the end of the movie he is living his dream, fighting villains and saving a Princess.  That’s his arc.  That’s his journey.  Without it the movie wouldn’t have been so engaging.

And what’s more, he’s not the only one in the story with an arc – and that’s a key point.  When writing a script, don’t make the mistake of focusing all of your attention on the hero’s arc.  Sometimes it is equally as important to plan an arc for the antagonist (villain) and supporting characters so that they too read as three-dimensional, real-life characters that have their own lives outside of the movie we see and that they are not simply there to support the hero in his quest.

To sum up: if you want your audience to truly identify with your protagonist then create a complex journey for them to take. Everybody has hopes, fears, dreams and flaws.  Make sure your central character has too.  What is their goal?  Is it emotional or physical?  What do they really want? How will they change throughout the story?  What obstacles force them to change?  Ask yourself these important questions as the narrative progresses so that each key event of the story not only serves the plot but is intrinsically linked to the overall “theme” and your central character arc.

Budding Writers Can Realize Their Dreams with the Right Tools

Filed under: Script Writing Software by admin @ 9:46 am on March 27, 2011

Everyone has dreams, but few ever get to realize them. When it comes to screenwriting, not everyone can put a script together that will be picked up by Hollywood, but it’s still a lot of fun trying. And besides, just seeing your script come to life when performed by a local theater company is still pretty incredible. Either way, aspiring writers will never get to know just how good they are or how far their work can take them if they don’t give screenwriting their best shot.

Putting a script together can seem a complex and daunting task, especially if a writer doesn’t have the right tools for the job. Organizing all those creative thoughts and managing the writing process requires specialist script writing software, otherwise budding writers can soon end up going around in circles and find themselves in a complete mess of scenarios and ideas. This creativity needs to be tempered by some order and structure – structure that can come from having script writing software that has been developed by successful writers, with other aspiring creative professionals in mind, at your disposal.

As well as helping to give the creative process some sort of organizational road map, the software helps with the presentation of the final document. Other people need to understand the ideas contained with the script and be able to envision how they would play out on screen.

Agents and theater companies receive a plethora of scripts every single day. Coherent presentation is the first step towards getting their attention and securing that first big break. While every new writer needs a slice of luck, they can also help themselves by investing in software to help them work like a professional.

The Right Tools are Needed to Draft a Screenplay

Filed under: Screenplay Writing Software by admin @ 11:30 am on March 7, 2011

Many people will tell you they have a book or a movie script in them somewhere, but that they just never get around to putting it down on paper. Writing a screenplay takes real determination, not to mention a story telling verve and imagination. The reality is that it can be a long and difficult process, especially if you attempt to simply write everything down in a word processing document.

No agent or production company is going to accept anything that isn’t well constructed and presented in the correct format which visualizes each idea and setting. Therefore, any aspiring script writers should consider using screenwriting software.

Here at Movie Outline we understand the importance of a professionally formatted script, which is why we’ve created the ultimate script writing software to give any new writers a head start when it comes to drafting their screenplays. This software was created by the successful script writer Dan Bronzite, and can be installed on either PC or Mac computer.

Not only does this scriptwriting software allow aspiring writers to present their final script professionally, but it also provides plenty of functionality to develop themes and ideas along the way. After all, developing a movie script isn’t a straightforward linear process, moving from point A to point B. It takes craft, vision and invention, and needs the right tools to help give structure to a writer’s scattergun creativity.

Movie Outline’s script writing software has helped thousands of would-be writers by giving them the confidence and the platform to draft and manage their ideas. Anyone who wants to break into screenwriting and realize their life’s ambition would do well to invest in this program.

Nuvotech launches Hollywood Script Express

Filed under: Press Releases by admin @ 2:41 pm on April 23, 2009

April 23, 2009  (London, UK) – Nuvotech is pleased to announce the launch of their new script submission and intellectual property registration service that provides screenwriters with professional printing, binding and shipping from their web browser.

Online Script Submission

Hollywood Script Express offers scriptwriters, wherever they are in the world, the ability to upload a screenplay and have it professionally printed and bound to industry standards from one of their Los Angeles Printing Partners and shipped the same day by FedEx or hand delivered by courier. This facility especially benefits out-of-state and overseas screenwriters who normally spend a great deal of money on shipping and cannot easily present their documents in Hollywood’s industry-specific format.

“As a writer based in London, this always proved an obstacle for me when I needed to send a script to Hollywood.” explains Dan Bronzite, CEO of Nuvotech. “First I had to order the US letter size paper (we use A4 in the UK) pre-three-holed-punched (we have two or four hole punches) and brass brads (we use different types) and then ship my script via an international courier which would cost a fortune. With HSX we have streamlined the entire process so that writers can submit their scripts to agents, producers, studios and contests at the click of a button.”

Submission Tools & Tracking

Once you have created an account with Hollywood Script Express, you can customize your calendar, track submissions, manage contacts, log responses, view graphical statistics and collate feedback. All of your script management tools are conveniently centralized into a single online interface that allows you to focus on the creative writing process and not the technicalities of the business. Additional screenwriter specific services will soon be available to Hollywood Script Express clients including coverage and proof-reading.

Intellectual Property Registration

Hollywood Script Express’ intellectual property registration service assists in establishing proof of your work’s completion date by providing a digital timestamp for your uploaded script and a documented record of your claim to authorship. Your encrypted file is stored securely for five years with the option to renew and you will receive a Registration Certificate and Unique Registration number.

Register for Free

Service Features

Become An Authorized Printing Partner

If you run a print & copy shop in Los Angeles, New York or Florida then the Hollywood Script Express Printing Partner Program may benefit your business. As an Authorized Hollywood Script Express Printing Partner you will be able to accept online orders for script submissions without owning a website or having e-commerce capability. Printing Partners can also earn commission on all future orders from referred customers.

Learn more

Enrol Today

About Nuvotech

Nuvotech is a software and Web 2.0 services company based in London, England. It was founded in 1999 by produced screenwriter and director Dan Bronzite to publish innovative software and services for the creative industry. Its most recognized brands are Movie Outline a cross-platform screenplay development application and Hollywood Script Express a script copying and delivery service in Los Angeles.

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