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Nuvotech Releases Script Studio® Creative Writing Software For Mac & PC

Filed under: Press Releases by admin @ 11:35 am on August 28, 2017

August 28, 2017 (London, UK) – UK technology company Nuvotech today announced the release of Script Studio® creative writing software – an innovative Mac & Windows desktop application for screenwriters, playwrights and novelists.

Script Studio - Creative Writing Software
 

Nuvotech has given its popular script and story development app Movie Outline a complete facelift, recoded the application from the ground up and rebranded it as Script Studio. This latest incarnation, which is now a serious contender for industry leader Final Draft, has a fresh, modern user-interface that is identical on Mac and Windows operating systems and supports the latest technologies such as Retina / HiDPI and Windows Touch Screen gestures.

“This is our biggest upgrade ever and we’ve really gone to town”, said Dan Bronzite, CEO, produced screenwriter and head developer. “Our primary objective is to streamline the writing process, giving writers both the space to create and the tools they need to effectively plan, structure, format and develop their screenplay.”

Some of the most notable additions to Script Studio are a dedicated novel mode, night mode, WYSIWYG Dual Dialogue that you can edit in situ, a global Scratch Pad, a bespoke Courier Nuvo font designed for writing screenplays, and improved import and export functionality that handles Final Draft 10 and Fountain files.”

Support For International Users

Perhaps the most crucial advancement is Script Studio’s newly implemented support for Unicode and diacritics, something which competitors Final Draft and Movie Magic have not provided to date. Script Studio also boasts the addition of over 100 international dictionaries and thesauri and the ability to write your script in right-to-left languages such as Hebrew, Arabic, Persian scripts and Urdu.

“Supporting the international writer was one of our key goals” remarks Nuvotech’s Product Manager Evelyne Kennedy. “While we understand that North America and Hollywood in particular is a key hotspot for screenwriting, there are many scriptwriting communities and production hubs all over the world, Bollywood being a prime example, and we wanted to ensure that Script Studio was accessible to those regions and users.”

Product Roadmap

When discussing the future of Script Studio, Evelyne Kennedy kept her cards close to her chest but hinted on an exciting few years ahead for users of their screenwriting software. She also noted the emerging importance of mobile screenwriting and cloud connectivity and confirmed that the iOS version is in active development.

Key Features

  • Professional Industry Standard Screenplay Formatting & Pagination
  • Sequence Outlining & Story Organization
  • Character Development Tools
  • Dedicated Novel Mode & Chapter Headings
  • Audience Engagement & Analysis Charting
  • Visual Drag ‘n’ Drop Index Cards
  • Color-Coded Structuring & Customizable Templates
  • Character Dialogue Focus
  • Global Scratch Pad
  • Story Tasks “To Do” List
  • Screenwriting Glossary
  • Dictation Assistant
  • Table Read “Text-To-Speech”
  • Powerful Print, Import & Export Options
  • 12 Scene by Scene Hollywood Movie Breakdowns & Analyses
  • 100% Cross-Platform File Exchange & Matching Modern UI

New In Script Studio

The latest release also includes full screen mode for distraction free writing, first-line indent and document leading options, customizable television, stageplay and musical layout templates, a character name wizard and gallery of headshot images, global search, Fountain markup and Final Draft 10 import/export and the ability to import and merge data from a third-party document format or another project file into an existing project.

Download a Free Trial or Buy Now from the Script Studio Store.

Educational Solutions

Script Studio is ideal for students learning screenwriting because of its intuitive and structured approach to story development which allows you to build your script or novel step by step and chapter by chapter and can easily be tailored into modules for teaching. The software is already adopted by schools and universities across North America and Europe and Nuvotech strongly supports this through affordable academic pricing for individual licenses and multiple seats for screenwriting labs.

Pricing and Availability

Script Studio is available as a download from the Script Studio website for Mac 10.7 and Windows 7 or higher operating systems. The suggested retail price is $199.95 but competitive upgrades and academic pricing is available if you contact Nuvotech directly.

About Nuvotech

Nuvotech is a software and web services company based in London, England founded in 1999 by produced screenwriter Dan Bronzite to offer innovative software and services for the creative writing industry. Its most recognized brands are Script Studio, a cross-platform creative writing application, and Hollywood Script Express a script copying and delivery service in Los Angeles.

Write Movies, Save Lives – Nuvotech Sponsors START Animal Rescue

Filed under: Press Releases by admin @ 9:02 pm on September 27, 2014
Learn more about this amazing charity!
 

Everyday thousands of pets are killed in Southern and Central California shelters. START (Shelter Transport Animal Rescue Team) was formed to address the issues of overpopulation by providing two very important components:

1. TRANSPORTS

Animals are rescued from high kill shelters and transported to Pacific Northwest rescue organizations, where they are re-homed.

2. SPAY/NEUTER

START funds veterinary clinics in local communities to facilitate no/low cost spay/neuter services, in the hopes of reducing unwanted births and less intakes at the already overcrowded animal shelters.

Write Movies, Save Lives…

Nuvotech now offers its screenwriting software Movie Outline 3 and Script It! through the START store at a discounted price and 20% of all proceeds go directly to START.

If you would like to make a difference for mistreated animals please subscribe to START’s recurring donation.

Remember, every gift saves lives!

Donate here: http://startrescue.org/donate/

Buy Software & Donate: http://startrescue.org/shop/alliance-partners/non-pet-related/

Nuvotech Releases New Reference Plugins For Movie Outline 3

Filed under: Press Releases by admin @ 3:16 pm on December 6, 2012

4 December, 2012 (London, UK) — UK technology company Nuvotech today launched six new movie Reference Plugins for its popular screenwriting software Movie Outline 3.

New Plugins

  • Iron Man (2008) Fantasy Action-Thriller
  • The Sixth Sense (1999) Supernatural Thriller
  • Ocean’s Eleven (2001) Crime Thriller
  • The Fugitive (1993) Action-Thriller
  • Wall Street (1987) Crime Drama
  • The Incredibles (2004) Animated Adventure

“The unique selling point of Movie Outline and its appeal to writers from novice to pro is that it was created and continues to be developed from a writer’s perspective” explains Dan Bronzite — produced screenwriter, director and Nuvotech CEO. “The software allows you to build your story and script beat by beat, and this ability to compare your own narrative with scene-by-scene outlines & analyses of box office hits is a key feature of its innovative design.”

Reference Plugins included for free in Movie Outline 3

  • Dead Poets Society
  • Die Hard
  • Ghost
  • Good Will Hunting
  • Pretty Woman
  • Scream
  • Seven
  • Spider-Man
  • The Terminator
  • There’s Something About Mary
  • True Romance
  • When Harry Met Sally

About Reference Plugins

Different movie genres require different amounts of steps. Dramas are typically around 35-40 steps because they usually have longer scenes than Thrillers, Comedies and Action and Adventure movies which are normally around 45 steps with more action and less dialogue. To help plan your project, Movie Outline allows you to simultaneously refer to produced feature film outlines and gauge the progress of your own story in contrast to the most successful Hollywood movies. By comparing your own character arcs, escalating conflicts, plot points and three act structure with the pros, you’ll be able to amend mistakes in your own pacing and successfully produce a well-structured screen story!

*Please Note: Plugins are scene-by-scene outlines & analyses of movies but do not contain the original screenplays.

Price & Availability

New plugins can only be purchased via Movie Outline 3′s integrated purchase wizard which allows you to buy securely from within the application and then have your plugins automatically downloaded and installed into your Reference Library.

To buy select “Buy Reference Plugins” from the Movie Outline 3 Help Menu.

Price Per Plugin: $9.95

Click here to buy Movie Outline 3 from our secure online store.

About Movie Outline

Movie Outline is innovative script formatting and screenplay development software for both the novice and professional screenwriter which uses the simple technique of step-outlining to build your story, characters and screenplay scene by scene, allowing you to focus on each key event of your script without losing sight of the bigger picture.

About Nuvotech

Nuvotech is a software and Web 2.0 services company based in London, England. It was founded in 1999 by produced screenwriter and director Dan Bronzite to publish innovative software and services for the creative industry. Its most recognized brands are Movie Outline a cross-platform screenplay development application and Hollywood Script Express a script copying and delivery service in Los Angeles.

Avoid Coincidence In Storytelling

Filed under: Dan Bronzite's Script Tips by Dan @ 2:41 pm on December 16, 2011

Constructing an original, entertaining and intelligent plot is hard work, but that should not mean you should settle for the easy option when writing a screenplay.  In fact, the opposite should apply.  If it’s difficult to come up with something original then push yourself as a screenwriter that much harder.  Force yourself to be innovative because if you do you will undoubtedly produce something much more engaging and satisfying for an audience in the process.

Many writers of fiction, especially crime fiction, use a MacGuffin in complicated plots to drive a story forward, and Alfred Hitchcock (who coined the term) was one of them.  The whole point of the MacGuffin is that it is irrelevant. As Hitchcock himself explained, the MacGuffin is: “the device, the gimmick, if you will, or the papers the spies are after… The only thing that really matters is that in the picture the plans, documents or secrets must seem to be of vital importance to the characters. To me, the narrator, they’re of no importance whatsoever.”

In the golden era of Hollywood, writers and directors were never always as concerned as their modern day counterparts to get all the facts straight.  So long as the women looked sexy, the men looked rugged and there were guns and chases the Hollywood Execs were happy.  To illustrate the point, you may have heard about the classic Howard Hawkes movie The Big Sleep with Bogart and Bacall, based on the novel by Raymond Chandler.

In the story there was confusion surrounding the death of the Sternwood family chauffeur, a character named Owen Taylor. Apparently somebody sent a telegram to Raymond Chandler asking him “Who killed the chauffeur?”.  He replied “Damned if I know.”  It’s an amusing anecdote but I know that from my experience when developing a screenplay with producers and development executives that you must have an answer for everything and that nobody would be impressed with a reply like that.

So to avoid such professional faux pas and to make  sure the logic of your crime thriller is coherent I suggest you do your utmost as a writer to iron out all the creases in your plot BEFORE you present it to anyone.  And most importantly, do not rely on coincidence to be the solution.  If you hero just happens to find a gun under the bed during a frantic struggle with his nemesis then that’s poor penmanship.  If your heroine loses her job and then just happens to bump into someone who offers her another, that’s lazy.

As always, there are exceptions to the rule and sometimes a particular story or genre can get away with it so long as it’s an intentional screenwriting choice and clear to the audience as such.  But generally you should set up events so they do not seem coincidental.  If it strikes you as obvious then try to figure out another way around revealing a crucial piece of information or engineering a chance meeting without it being too contrived.  If that fails, you could always try to conceal your coincidence behind a powerful moment of action or drama and hope the audience don’t notice!

Be Bold With Your Screenwriting

Filed under: Dan Bronzite's Script Tips by Dan @ 2:32 pm on November 16, 2011

Every screenwriter wants to create an original, entertaining and memorable movie but that goal is often hard to achieve.  There is no magic formula, no matter what anybody says.  Yes, there are structural paradigms, specific working practices, character development methods and even screenwriting software but a good screenplay normally hinges on one thing and one thing alone – the writer.

Only the writer with his or her unique voice and original ideas can turn a run-of-the-mill story into a roller-coaster read with the potential to become a Hollywood blockbuster.  As a screenwriter you need to fully invest yourself into your project heart and soul and push yourself at every plot and page turn.  If you simply want to make some money or “be famous” then forget it.  Don’t insult an audience with that kind of attitude, because if you don’t love what you’re writing, why should anybody else.

I’m not saying you can’t combine commerciality and a pay check with screenplay writing because you can, so long as you challenge yourself to remain as true as possible to your characters and theme along the way.  That means BE BOLD with your creative writing choices. Try to engage your reader from page one.  Throw them into the thick of your story as soon as possible and give them something compelling to chew over until the next big scene.  Always punctuate your story with unforgettable moments that keeps them wanting more.

If you need to write a talking heads scene in a diner, try to be innovative.  Hurl something at the audience they wouldn’t expect.  If it’s an action movie, make the audience think that this scene is going to be about plot exposition without action then surprise them with a set-piece from left-field.  If it’s a drama, create an out-of-the-blue confrontation between your Protagonist and an innocent bystander that shocks us and reveals an aspect of our hero or heroine we have not seen before.

You, as a screenwriter, are the God of your imaginary world. And as we all know “With great power comes great responsibility”.. so don’t waste it.  Ensure that your creative writing choices have integrity.  Keep your audience guessing.  Make every scene the best it can be and not just a page filler because you’ve run out of fresh ideas or are just getting lazy.  If you’ve received development notes from a friend, script consultant or development executive, don’t just write by numbers to please them.  Take all feedback on board as a challenge to you as a writer to become a better writer and write better scripts.  Be original.  Be passionate.  And most importantly, be bold.

Structure Vs Free-Form Script Writing

Filed under: Dan Bronzite's Script Tips by Dan @ 2:07 pm on November 6, 2011

Screenwriters, novice and pro, will inevitably have their own contrasting methodologies for writing a screenplay and you will often hear conflicting rules to adhere to from prominent screenwriting gurus on how to write a script.

So what is the best way to write your movie?

Should you plan every minute detail or simply unlock your mind to a cinematic stream of consciousness and go with the flow?

Well, I would suggest the answer is both!

When I first started out as a screenwriter I would get an idea for a story or sometimes simply the opening scene, a great ending or even a cool set-piece somewhere in the middle of act two and then jump into the script.  I wouldn’t even use a computer but instead write it all down with a pen on a lined pad.  In fact, I wrote my first ever script that way and it was optioned and while it never got produced it did prove to be a great writing sample and clinched my first spec sale and multiple assignments.

Since my first script I have written many without a coherent plan and many with a fully-structured outline – so what have I learned from the experience?  Well, “free-form” script writing typically means many more rewrites because these scripts inevitably need a lot of editing to cut out the flab, and a lot more scene shuffling, because the scene to scene plot progression and character development was not planned at the beginning.  And with the outlined projects?  They of course still require rewrites, but much fewer and the central storyline and character journeys in these screenplays were always much clearer from the start which meant that theme could be expressed through dialogue, action and visuals more instinctively.

With all these lessons learned, and after many development meetings where I had to present my ideas for rewrites, I ultimately invented my own screenwriting software Movie Outline specifically for screenwriters to outline a story before diving head first into a screenplay.  I discovered that free-form screenplay writing without following a proper structure sometimes pays off, and other times it doesn’t.  I also learned that you can still free-form your script during the story planning stage and the scene writing stage and it’s just as satisfying and rewarding.

Outlining and structuring my story is now instinctual for me as a screenwriter and it has made me a better writer.  It has also made developing a script with producers, directors and executives a much easier process, especially when you are trying to communicate your ideas for project changes.  So now, even if I get a great idea for a movie and want to start writing I don’t immediately leap into the script, I let the idea gestate and then start planning the story.  Sometimes I may write a scene if I have to get it out of my head and then plot where that scene can take me but I’ve managed to strike a balance between creativity and methodology and this is the key.. for me.

My advice for first-time screenwriters who are about to launch into their first screenplay is try to find your own balance between free-form writing and a structured approach.  I do recommend outlining your story first but try not to initially get too caught up on the “three-act” blueprint, any particular structural paradigm or too much detail. Allow your story and ideas to flow and then go back to what you’ve written and change it around if necessary.  Cut scenes out, combine scenes, clearly define your act breaks and don’t let formulas hinder your creative juices on the first pass.

This initial process helps you discover your own voice and style, and trust me, it’s better to write something crap on a blank page rather than stare at it all day or plan, plan, plan – sometimes used as an excuse by writers to procrastinate. As you become more accustomed to the screenwriting process, outlining and structuring will become second nature and crucially you will be able identify flaws in your script during the planning stage rather than waiting for someone to point it out to you at the end.

Nuvotech’s Creative Writing Software Now Available from Best Buy and Amazon in Canada

Filed under: Press Releases by admin @ 1:30 pm on October 20, 2011

UK technology company Nuvotech today announced the availability of their popular creative writing software Movie Outline 3 and Script It! to Canadian customers through Best Buy’s Canadian online store.

“We’re very pleased to offer Canadian writers the opportunity to order our software from within their own country with free shipping — and from one of the world’s most trusted brands.” comments Dan Bronzite, produced screenwriter and CEO of Nuvotech.

Visit BestBuy.ca to order Movie Outline 3 or Script It! today and write your own Hollywood Blockbuster!

Movie Outline 3 is also available from Amazon.ca, as is Script It!.

About Best Buy

Best Buy is Canada’s fastest-growing specialty retailer and e-tailer of consumer electronics, personal computers and entertainment software.  Best Buy offers consumers a unique shopping experience with the latest technology and entertainment products, at the right price, with a no-pressure (non-commissioned) sales environment.  The Company is committed to kids and communities, supporting non-profit organizations that help youth develop their skill set, discover their talents and sustain a lasting interest in education.

About Amazon

Amazon.com, Inc.is a multinational electronic commerce company headquartered in Seattle, Washington, United States and is the world’s largest online retailer.

About Nuvotech

Nuvotech Limited is a software and Web 2.0 services company based in London, England. It was founded in 1999 by produced screenwriter and director Dan Bronzite to publish innovative software and services for the creative industry. Its most recognized brands are Movie Outline a cross-platform screenplay development application and Hollywood Script Express a script copying, copyright and delivery service in Los Angeles.

Nuvotech teams with the Dysfunctional Screenwriters Society

Filed under: Press Releases by admin @ 10:53 am on September 21, 2011

PHILADELPHIA, PA – The Dysfunctional Screenwriters Society has teamed with UK technology company Nuvotech, publisher of popular screenwriting software Movie Outline 3, to award winners of Power of the Pitch 3 copies of their story outlining and movie script formatting software Script It!

Power of the Pitch 3 will be held from 6pm-9pm on October 19th 2011, at the Free Library of Philadelphia.

Nuvotech is a software and Web 2.0 services company based in London, England. It was founded in 1999 by produced screenwriter Dan Bronzite to publish innovative software and services for the creative industry. Its most recognized brands are Movie Outline a cross-platform screenplay development application and Hollywood Script Express a script  copying and delivery service in Los Angeles. Script It! is based on the same innovative writing methodology of “step-outlining” that has proved so popular with users of Movie Outline. This “sequence” approach allows you to plan the structure of your screen story and professionally format your screenplay step by step.

The Dysfunctional Screenwriters Society was started in 2009 by screenwriter, Keith Chamberlain for the purpose of providing aspiring screenwriters in the Philadelphia area, the opportunity to meet, network, and critique works in progress with other aspiring screenwriters. The Dysfunctional Screenwriters Society has amassed a membership of over 150 screenwriters in the Philadelphia, New Jersey and Delaware area and its group of participating individuals meet monthly to discuss ideas and exchange professional advice. Power of the Pitch is a biannual event designed to educate screenwriters how to pitch their respective television, film or web projects to directors and producers. The first two Power of the Pitches drew an estimated attendance of 75 people from all over the Tri-State area.

If you would like to attend this event or  join the DSS mailing list please visit The Dysfunctional Screenwriters Society.

To receive more information about Nuvotech products and services please visit Nuvotech.

Pacing is Often the Key to a Successful Screenplay

Filed under: Dan Bronzite's Script Tips by Dan @ 1:53 pm on September 17, 2011

To help you understand story pacing and how to write a script that keeps the reader turning the page it may help to think of your screenplay as a piece of music.  The music can be in any genre since most pop and rock songs share the same constant as is apparent in classical pieces – they all have a melodic rhythm with highs and lows. If they didn’t then essentially it would not really be called “music” but “noise”.

Let’s first consider a pop song.  Some start out loud and fast with an intro that reflects the chorus or the actual chorus itself and then dips to begin the first verse which is normally slower.  After this comes the bridge which steps up the pace a little leading us into the chorus.. and then this repeats until the end of the song.  About three-quarters of the way through there is normally the middle-8 section which is different from the verse, bridge and chorus in rhythm and melody and this helps break up the pattern before the last chorus.

All of these different sections of a typical song create pace, fast and slow, slow and fast and this pacing keeps us engaged.  Let’s not forget, a song is more than music, it’s a story in itself, whether it has words or it doesn’t have words.  Even classical music tells a story through the choice of instruments used, the melody and the arrangement.  That’s why it’s so natural to compare musical rhythm and pacing with script writing because they share the same core principles.

Another great analogy is the roller-coaster ride which also applies to movie making and screenplay writing. A roller-coaster also goes up and down.  Trust me, you wouldn’t go back to Six Flags theme park if all of the rides literally went from A to B on the same level at the same speed – would you?  No, they good rides create tension, anticipation and excitement through the design of the twists and turns, where they are positioned, the acceleration and deceleration, and the slow climb followed by the dip.  All of these ingredients combine to create “entertainment” for the participant and as a script reader or audience member you want to experience the same thrills when reading a script or watching a movie.

Remember, it’s your job as a screenwriter to keep the reader turning the page.  You have to build toward those key moments of heightened action or drama in your story and then follow them with a lull that becomes the beginning of the next big crescendo.  By visualizing your narrative in this way you will ensure that your script stands out and provides a roller-coaster read!  And if you want to analyze the pacing of your own creative writing projects, I recommend our screenwriting software Movie Outline 3 which includes a unique and innovative story pacing feature called FeelFactors.

Movie Outline Gets Thumbs Up From HubPages Review

Filed under: Script Writing Software by admin @ 2:03 pm on September 12, 2011

Ladies and Gentlemen, fellow hubbers, I’m proud to admit that I’ve just finished my first screenplay.

My third, actually, but with the others I gave up at around page 40 and dumped them in the ‘What was I thinking?’ folder back in the darkest recesses of my laptop.

So what made the difference this time? I can honestly say (and they’re not paying me) that it was Movie Outline Scriptwriting Software, a new-on-the-block screenwriting software system that helps you to build your screenplay step by step.

How is Movie Outline different?

The other screenwriting software systems format your work, so that your dialogue and direction come out in the standard industry format which ensures the felling of a good number trees. Movie Outline does this too, but it does so much more besides…

Click here to read the full review.

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